Coffee Table Books

Diogenes by George Pavlu (2003)

In stock
Product No
CMS2803375
$17.00

Here is a book that barks at fleas with cynic wit. And what a restorative sight - Diogenes the Dog snapping at the heels of 'homo consumerus' at prayer in their temples to modernity - Shopping Malls - urging the decidedly un-chic virtue of frugality: to know that enough is enough IS ENOUGH!

This Cynic Dog who eschewed possessions as ludicrous fashion accessories and so inoculated himself against being possessed by possessions, practiced 'back-to-nature' philosophy - that urban fantasy which no full life is without. Living in his barrel, he scoffed at conventions with his inimitable canine insouciance, presenting to the Hellenic world the picture-perfect of Cynic freedom.

And what would Diogenes make of the escalating panoply of borders so fragmenting the peoples of the world from one another that, in self-enclosure and exclusion, they feverishly espouse nationalism? Diogenes was the first to call himself a Cosmopolitan - 'citizen of the world' - thus rejecting citizenship of any nation, favouring instead membership of the human race.

Product Overview
Product NoCMS2803375
Weight (g)185 g
AuthorGeorge Pavlu
PublisherHesperian Press
EditionN/A
Edition DateMar-03
PagesN/A
Size140 x 190 x 1mm
FormatPaperback
ISBN9780859053259
PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Here is a book that barks at fleas with cynic wit. And what a restorative sight - Diogenes the Dog snapping at the heels of 'homo consumerus' at prayer in their temples to modernity - Shopping Malls - urging the decidedly un-chic virtue of frugality: to know that enough is enough IS ENOUGH!

This Cynic Dog who eschewed possessions as ludicrous fashion accessories and so inoculated himself against being possessed by possessions, practiced 'back-to-nature' philosophy - that urban fantasy which no full life is without. Living in his barrel, he scoffed at conventions with his inimitable canine insouciance, presenting to the Hellenic world the picture-perfect of Cynic freedom.

And what would Diogenes make of the escalating panoply of borders so fragmenting the peoples of the world from one another that, in self-enclosure and exclusion, they feverishly espouse nationalism? Diogenes was the first to call himself a Cosmopolitan - 'citizen of the world' - thus rejecting citizenship of any nation, favouring instead membership of the human race.

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